Totally Confused With How To Play A Golf Shot

Through the course of 6000+ golf shots I take each year, I can honestly say that I might be confused on how to play a golf shot a couple of times. I believe I can assess how to play 99.5% within seconds of arriving at my ball. The other 0.5% of the time I will have to think about my best options. But, every so often (actually rarely) I am confused or dumbfounded on how to play a shot. I know this sounds crazy, but it happens!

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Battling My Swing and Winning

Originally, I was going to title this article “Fighting My Swing and Losing”. However, I realized that this in not inline with how I want to approach my golf game. Instead of focusing on the bad part of my game, I think I need to stay on positive path to improve my changes of lowering my golf scores. So, it is important that I remind myself that I need to focus on how to improve without focusing on the negative side of my poor results.

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Aggressive Golf To Low Scores

Golf is an interesting game. You can swing less to hit far; hit to a shorter yardage on the fairway to set-up your next shot; hit a 3-wood of the tee to play safe; and use course management to avoid all trouble. But every once in a while, a player must hit an aggressive shot to score low! Continue reading

Recovery Shots in Golf

It is easy to be a great golfer when hitting the ball down the middle of the fairway. Generally, the short grass provides a great lie for an equally great shot into the green. Unfortunately, most of us are not as consistent as we hope and errant shots occur from time to time.

After watching this video, it is obvious that being able to perform a recovery shot is important to your golf game. I helps lower scores and build confidence; however, the I have to suggest that most amateurs should beware of the consequences of attempting a shot that has great risk. (as a side note, number 6 was my favorite)

When faced with an impossible lie, immovable objects or a crazy shot that requires a special touch, your ability to recover and reduce the damage to your score is paramount to a great round of golf. Through the years, I have heeded the saying “take your medicine” after a poor shot, but sometimes a something special is required keep a great round going. This is when knowing when to make that recovery shot (course management) plays an important role in your game.

For me, recovery shots have three important parts that every golfer must understand. They are the tenants I use when deciding if a risk/reward recovery shot is needed. If you are wondering, this is how I look at these special shots:

Do I need to make that recovery shot – as silly not as this sounds, it has to be the first question. If I do not gain any real advantage from making a special shot, through a small gap as an example, then there is no point in compounding my original error by making another one. This is when I default to a safe shot or punch out. In essence, I take my medicine.

Can I visualize the recovery shot – all the great scramblers can visualize their shot before they make it. The can see exactly what they need to do and know they have a shot in their bag to do it. There is no sense in attempting a recovery shot if I have no idea how to actually perform it! If I proceed without visualizing the shot, then it is just plain ego clouding my judgement. Again, it is time to take my medicine!

Perform the recovery shot with confidence – this may sound simple, but difficult shots weigh heavily on my confidence. If I attempt a shot with doubt in my mind, then it is likely this is wrong shot to be making. Confidence is critical during a recovery shot. It is that special something that allows me to do special things on the course.

Recovery shots are critical to golf. As a single digit handicapper, I have learned the lesson of ego on risk/reward shots many times. My greatest lesson is to ensure I can answer yes to my three criteria for a recovery shot before proceeding. I recommend you do as well.

These are my thoughts on recovery shots. What are yours?

I am a grateful golfer! See you on the links!