Take Time to Enjoy Your Round of Golf

I am feeling nostalgic today. It has been just over 10 months since my stem cell treatment and my recovery is still ongoing. I am doing very well and I am blessed to have many awesome things in my life. After kicking the ugly “C Monster” to the curb twice, I realize many things that were important no longer have any real impact on my life. One aspect that has become more important is to enjoy my round of golf before, during and definitely after a round.

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A Golf Lesson About Life

Life LessonA professor stood before his philosophy class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, he wordlessly picked up a very large and empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with golf balls. He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.

The professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles rolled into the open areas between the golf balls. He then asked the students again if the jar was full. They agreed it was. Continue reading

Golf Infographic: What Wedge When?

Selecting the right wedge at the right time is critical to low golf scores. Over the years, I have adjusted my wedge use to what I believe is an 90% solution. Most of the time, my wedge selection is consistent and the results speak for themselves.

Beginners have a greater challenge. They understand that the different wedges need to be used at different times, but unfortunately there is a bit of confusion on when. The following infographic hopes to demystify what wedge to use when.
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A Golf Lesson About Life

Life LessonA professor stood before his philosophy class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, he wordlessly picked up a very large and empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with golf balls. He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.

The professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles rolled into the open areas between the golf balls. He then asked the students again if the jar was full. They agreed it was.

The professor next picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else. He asked once more if the jar was full.. The students responded with a unanimous ‘yes.’

The professor then produced two Beers from under the table and poured the entire contents into the jar effectively filling the empty space between the sand.The students laughed..

‘Now,’ said the professor as the laughter subsided, ‘I want you to recognize that this jar represents your life. The golf balls are the important things—-your family, your children, your health, your friends and your favorite passions—-and if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full. The pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, your house and your car.. The sand is everything else—-the small stuff.

‘If you put the sand into the jar first,’ he continued, ‘there is no room for the pebbles or the golf balls. The same goes for life.

If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff you will never have room for the things that are important to you.

Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness.

Spend time with your children. Spend time with your parents. Visit with grandparents. Take your spouse out to dinner. Play another 18. There will always be time to clean the house and mow the lawn.

Take care of the golf balls first—-the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.

One of the students raised her hand and inquired what the Beer represented. The professor smiled and said, ‘I’m glad you asked.’ The Beer just shows you that no matter how full your life may seem, there’s always room for a couple of Beers with a friend.

This is a version of ‘The Lesson Of Life’ circulating on the internet.  Something to consider: working on fitness and flexibility is a golf ball and buying a new driver every year is sand. This life lesson struck home with me because setting attainable, challenging goals is extremely important to succeeding in golf.  Staying focused on how to achieve those goals is invaluable.

Do you know your golf balls from your sand?

Oh yeah don’t forget, there is always time for a beer with your friend.  I am a grateful golfer!  See you on the links!

Choosing a New Wedge

Today I received an email from a friend asking about wedges.  He is a good golfer and getting better all the time.  He was talking about which wedge he needed from 110 yards. As we had played quite often, I was familiar with his game and was able to explain that he required a 52 degree wedge.  As our discussion continued I realized that selecting the correct club is very important to all aspects of your game.  So I did some research and this is what I came up with:

Pitching Wedge

A pitching wedge has a loft of about 48 degrees.  This club comes with most sets and is used for long approach shots.  The distance varies, but I suggest that it is used by most amateurs from 130 yards or closer.

Gap Wedge

Gap wedges range from 50 and 54 degrees. The distance the ball travels varies from about 110 to about 75 yards.  It allows for a bit of action on the ball and probably used most of the time.

Sand Wedge

Sand wedges range from 54 to 58 degrees.  Many players use a sand wedge for some approach shots as well as sand shots.

Lob Wedge

Lob wedges range from 58 and 62 degrees. The lob wedge allows for a greater amount of spin and is used to fly over hazards or when you are pin hunting.

One of the things to be aware of when purchasing a wedge is the bounce.  The conditions of the course, especially the traps, will determine the bounce required when using a  wedge.  See Golfsmith.com for an explanation on bounce.

I use a 48 degree pitching wedge, 52 degree gap wedge, a 56 degree sand wedge and a 60 degree lob wedge.  I have experimented with different lofts, but I have found that these wedges work best for my game.

Now back to my friend.  Ultimately he made the best decision.  He decided to try out a few wedges before making his purchase.  He was going to try wedges with different loft, brand and bounce.  I suggested that it was a great idea and thus has sparked the reason for this blog.

When picking a club, I recommend that you go the to range, golf store, putting green and practice with your intended choice.  Most courses have demo wedges/clubs and will allow you to take them on the course for a test run.  By doing a bit of research before you buy, you will be happy with your choice and likely lower your score.

How you do you pick your clubs?