15 Minute Golf Lesson

Who would have thought that a 15 minute golf lesson would shape the future of my 2015 golfing season. My recent excursion to the Toronto Golf and Travel Show, as you have read from the past two posts, was fun and educational. However, the highlight of my time at the golf show as the 15 minute golf lesson I received from James Hutchinson, an Associate Golf Professional at Blue Springs Golf Club.

At the start of the lesson, James asked me what I wanted to work on, how much I golfed, and where I played. My objective of the lesson was to hit the ball further off the tee and after a quick discussion, we were ready to start. We grabbed a 7-iron to warm up and a driver with a stiff shaft; it was almost exactly like my driver back home. As I warmed up, we continued to discuss my goals and he said something I thought was quite funny, yet extremely important.

I explained that by gaining the extra distance, it would equate to lower scores. I mentioned I was trying to consistently hit the ball about 260-270 yards off the tee instead of my normal 240-250. This would allow me to approach the green with an 8 or 9 iron instead of my usual 6 or 7 iron. Above all, I wanted to keep my accuracy. James suggested that I should practice putting and chipping more to lower my scores. Although he was tough and cheek at that time, this advice is excellent and should be heeded by everyone.

Golf lesson

Golden Tips

 

Ok, back to the lesson. After he watch me hit about 15 balls, he notice that my swing was smooth, but not generating the power I was looking for!  James explained that a swing has three distinct motions: the first movement of the lower body (he called the bump), the rotation of the chest to catch up with the hips, and the follow through of all body parts to the a high finish. Well this was profound for me. I understood the mechanics, but James suggestion of a bump first with the hips was the missing piece I was looking for to hit the ball farther.

Check out the video below to see what I mean:

So I am practicing the three distinct movements without a club. It does feel uncomfortable, but I think this is going to be my way forward to improve my game in the early part of the upcoming golf season.

Thanks James, I am grateful for the tip. Anyone looking for a lesson and you are in the Acton, Ontario area, James is your man.

I am a grateful golfer! See you on the links!

11 thoughts on “15 Minute Golf Lesson

  1. Pingback: Pareto’s Principle and Golf | The Grateful Golfer

  2. Keep drilling and find that “feel”! Cool you found a different perspective that resonates with you

    Seriously, get an Orange Whip….

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  3. Jim

    Glad to hear you had a “ah ha!” moment during your golf show lesson. That is something I have been working on as well. Generally my sequence is pretty good but I can get in ruts where I get out of sequence and start the downswing with my upper body which compromises power and consistency. A “bump” seems to be a good swing thought to practice. Thanks for sharing.

    Cheers!
    Josh

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  4. Awesomeness GG. And makes sense. When I’m not focusing on about 12 other things sometimes I focus on that and I find bringing my left heel firmly back to touching the ground sometimes helps with that hip movement. Funny how you get those gems off the cuff sometimes. Good stuff thx!

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    • SVG

      Thanks! I am with you about lots to focus on. I normally keep my left foot on the ground. For me it will be to keep my legs bent through the swing. It is tougher than it sounds. Thanks for the comment.

      Cheers
      Jim

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  5. Have you ever looked into the Stack & Tilt? Starting your weight on your front foot and keeping it there throughout the swing. My in-laws have gone this way and it isn’t much different than the traditional swing.

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  6. The 15 minute lesson is a great aspect of the golf show and I regret not pursuing that. Glad it was a great experience for you. Great post, Jim

    Mike

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