Improving Your Golf Game One Shot At A Time

To improve any golf game away from the course takes a bit knowledge and understanding about your swing. Currently, I am using video, alignment sticks, aim points, and now impact stickers. Yup, instead of using foot powder on my golf club, I bought some target stickers that attach to my clubs. This is new to me and I am still getting used to the information it is providing.

I bought these and they are more than I can use in on season.

I bought these particular impact sticker off Amazon on one of my retail therapy days. (Golf Impact Tape – Golf Impact Labels for Driver Wood and Irons, Practice Swing Training Impact Labels – 252 Driver Labels) I figured the price was right, so I had nothing to loose. And decided to give them a try. Although there is only one review which is very poor, I can say that I am not disappointed. I do not experience the same challenges as the review suggest. They provide immediate feed back which is a great benefit when hitting golf balls into my DIY driving net.

What I liked about them was the lines and guarantee that no residue would be left of my golf clubs. So far, they are as good as their advertising. On a side note, I am not affiliated with this product in anyway.

Easily attach to my 7 iron.

The main reason I bought this type of training aid is to see if I was hitting in the center of the club face during my swing. I often wonder if my hitting pattern is tight or all over the player.

I have used the stickers on several occasions and find that 12 golf balls hit per sticker is the right amount. (The company selling them suggests six hits per sticker) After 12 shots, the sticker stops providing the immediate feedback because the hitting area is too full of ball marks. Additionally, I tried hitting about 20 balls per sticker and found that the impact label started to break down and became harder to take off my club.

After using a couple of impact labels as test runs. I thought it was time to focus on what valuable information the label actually provides. Here is what the first 12 balls looked like:

As you can see, my hitting area is fairly wide and needs to be tightened up to ensure I am hitting the center of the circle more often than not. Additionally, you notice the shot off the two of the club. It is funny because when I made that shot, I felt my right elbow drop too low too fast. I was able to feel the miss hit and understand why.

My second set of 12 golf balls was a little tighter. It was also a bit higher on the club face. I made this adjustment by moving the ball back in my stance just a bit so I am trapping the ball more. This is information is valuable, but not surprising. My swing is always like this early in the season until I retrain my body to swing more fluidly.

At this point I am very satisfied with the impact labels. They are providing the information I need to improve my swing. I do not have to use the labels all the time, but will use them as a verification that I am improving my swing. Lastly, I think this is an inexpensive way to improve my golf game. I expect the impact labels will last a couple of years so the value is definitely there.

Do you use impact tape or labels?

I am a grateful golfer! See you on the links!

10 thoughts on “Improving Your Golf Game One Shot At A Time

  1. My first club fitting was before we had computerized tracking equipment. They used impact tape on the face and the heel to help find the right club set up for me. I’ve never used tape since, but, I do use foot powder on occasion. I find it handier on the range. I can get feedback from the face, the ground, and even some visual cues if I want them. The can sits in one of the pockets in my bag along with some sunscreen and insect repellent. It’s one of the essentials that go with me everywhere my bag goes.

    Well, I found the perfect time to play to be safe from the virus. A rainy day is all it takes. I walked the course today and the first nine was a little slow but it started raining as we made the turn and everyone ran for the shelters. I played on even when it came down hard enough to make it next to impossible to see through my glasses. And I played well. 2 birdies, a par, then two more birdies is how I played through the rain. Then one bogie on the way out after it ended thanks to a badly toed 4 iron off the tee. It was my fault. I really wanted to draw that ball around the dogleg and leave myself an 80 yard approach from the center. A shot I’ve done many times, but this time, I think I tried to control it too much. Oh, and my running shoes were squishing before the rain stopped. One thing real golf shoes would have been better at. So I’ll probably go buy a new pair soon. The rainy season isn’t far away.

    Liked by 1 person

      • I have plenty of practice playing in the rain but to be fair the section of the course I played while it rained was some of the easiest holes on the course for me. So scoring well through that section, rain or no wasn’t too big a deal. And the work I’ve been doing to hit ball first helped a great deal on the approach shots.

        It also helped that I carry a rain suit and wet weather gloves in my bag for when the weather changes mid round. So I was well prepared.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Jim

    Impact tape is widely used and (as you say) provides immediate feedback. I am still working through Dr Scholl’s foot spray to do the same thing. The launch monitor that I bought (ES14) provides a lot of data, including distance, ball speed, club head speed, launch angle and smash factor, however the powder does provide me with a quick reference to where I am delivering the club face to the ball. Like you, I also find the powder allows me to make adjustments to stance and swing path.

    Kirk

    Liked by 1 person

    • Kirk

      That sounds about right for adjustment of stance and swing path. There are so many possibilities out there for training aids and tools that we have to be selective about where to put our money. Sounds like your ES14 was a fantastic purchase.

      Cheers Jim

      Like

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