Breaking 100 with Consistency

“If there is one thing I have learned during my years as a professional, it is that the only thing constant about golf is its inconstancy.” – Jack Nicklaus

The Golden Bear describes many golf games.  Watching the tour it is not difficult to see that consistency is the key to success.  For example: Phil Mickelson is currently on the bad side of consistency; he has played in 6 events and only has 4 top 25 finishes, missed the cut once and withdrew once.  Not one of Mickelson’s memorable starts!  However, Harris English is 5th in the FEDEX points; he has played 11 events with 6 top tens and has made the cut in every event – extremely consistent.  Looking around the professional and amateur ranks, it is not difficult to see that consistency is one of the major keys to success!

Consistency is defined as reliability or uniformity of successive results or events – pitched with remarkable consistency throughout the season.  Basically, accurate repeating of the same stroke at the same distance with similar results.  The stroke does not have to be pretty, but the results, when trying to break 100, have to consistent.  This is really the key to great golf.

Regardless of a players handicap, consistency drives their score.  A single digit handicap player will be extremely consistent in most areas of their game.  The closer to the pin, the more consistent the player becomes.  Their short game is really something to watch – it is almost magical.  If you watch professional golf, their short game is sometimes breath-taking as they  consistently make miracle shots when least expected.

To achieve consistency and break 100 there is a magic formula.  It is the best kept secret and is repackaged everyday.  It is free and anyone can follow the simple process. Here it is – PRACTICE YOUR SHORT GAME!

I know many will say that you cannot even hit the ball well – that might be true, but most beginners will waste 3-5 shots around the green on every hole.  They will 3-4 putt, chip the ball 2 and three times or get in the sand and have a hard time getting out!  We have all been there and experience shows that consistency around the green is the first step towards lowering your score and achieving milestones.

If you are still skeptical, ask any player who scores consistently low, 98% of them will point to how well they chipped and putted during their round!  To confound Jack Nicklaus’ quote, take time to practice your short game it will be the first steps to breaking 100.

I am a grateful golfer!  See you on the links!

8 thoughts on “Breaking 100 with Consistency

  1. Pingback: Breaking 100 Without Quick Fixes | The Grateful Golfer

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  3. Jim, you know I 100% agree with you on the short game. Putting alone, for an above average player, accounts for almost half the strokes in a round. No brute strength needed, just “touch”.

    Do you have more perceived “fun” the better you play? You know, more than just shooting a lower score, although that certainly can be a part of the equation.

    Getting closer to play time Jim. How goes the fitness prep for the season for you?

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    • Rick

      I just have more fun. There is no perceived in it at all. I believe that the better people play, the more fun they have. It leads into a different conversation about expectations and goals….a different blog perhaps.

      My fitness is going very well. I am training 4 times a week and I am playing basketball for my Wing. I have about a month left before hitting the links…I hope.

      Flexibility is the next step. Good luck on your recovery!

      Cheers
      Jim

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      • 4 times per week and hoops?! That’s great Jim. We could have a great conversation on “experience” in general. Thanks for well wishes. Rehab should start for me on Saturday.

        Like

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