Mental Attitude is Everything in Golf

Making the 30 minute trip to and from work everyday affords me the opportunity to expand my knowledge by listening to audio books. Over the past couple of days, I have listened to the “Keys of Positive Thinking” by Napoleon Hill. This compilation of speeches made by Hill is very interesting and touches on many topics I already subscribe to. However, his 3 minute talk on Mental Attitude struck a chord with me and realized it is one of my success in golf.

The Cole’s Notes of his talk outlines that how we think is how we perform. If we have a positive mental attitude, we will see the world in a positive manner. Conversely, will happen with a negative mental attitude. This is nothing new, but Hill also added, at least in my mind, a special point that shouts golf. He talked about focus!

In this case, focus is not concentration, but where we tune our mental thoughts. The mental attitude that all aspects of golf are within our grasp will help drive in my golf game. We transmit razor focus and it will be transferred into something very good in out game. Of course, thought without action leads nowhere. By focusing on being successful in our golf game will lead to success.

I realize this entire concept sounds foreign, but I do believe in the a positive and focused mental attitude helps my golf game. It keeps me motivated to improve, seek better ways to succeed and to understand that improving is a process, not something that magically happens.

What are your thoughts on a mental attitude? Does it help your game?

I am a grateful golfer! See you on the links!

12 thoughts on “Mental Attitude is Everything in Golf

  1. Jim,

    Agree with how important this is. A way I try to keep in a positive frame of mind is looking at every shot as an opportunity, whether it’s from the fairway, a bunker or behind a tree. There are opportunities to recover and limit damage, opportunities to score, opportunities to show good course management, and the list goes on. When every shot feels like an opportunity I stay in a good frame of mind.

    Cheers
    Josh

    Liked by 1 person

    • Josh

      That is a great way to frame each situation….as an opportunity. It is interesting how we all say the same things, but frame it differently. I think I will borrow your idea moving forward. It works for me. Thanks.

      Cheers
      Josh

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi Jim, I was in a match-play event yesterday, going along nicely, three up through seven holes, when there was a discussion on the next tee. The other two ball in the tournament wanted to play faster, of course I politely told them this is my pace. Needles to say after that exchange I lost the next two holes, I had lost my focus.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Pete,

      That is interesting that the other group said they wanted you to play faster. Knowing your responses on other posts, did they want to run the course? I hope you won the match.

      Cheers
      Jim

      Like

      • I know I play better when the pace is fast. Almost all of my best games were played in under 3 hours. Most in under 2. So I can relate to this complaint. I don’t hold the others in Pete’s foursome wrong to ask, but I also don’t hold Pete wrong for his answer to them. We all have the same right to play at a comfortable speed.

        But I do think there is a fundamental disadvantage to people who play best fast in this type of situation. There is no way to force faster play, but it is a simple thing to slow everyone else with AND behind you down by simply slowing down yourself.

        Pete doesn’t mention if they were keeping up with the groups ahead or not. So I have no way to decide whether they were reasonable in their request to move faster. But I do believe if you feel play is too slow you have the right to ask at least. And since Pete said it took him from his game, I plan on remembering AND using it myself in the future.

        If it has even a chance at evening the playing field, and it’s legal, it’s worth trying. Now I have to hope no one I compete against reads your blog or I’m in for a lot of 5 hour rounds. lol

        Like

      • Kevin

        Thanks for weighing in. Yes, people have the right to ask, but I am in Pete’s corner that he had the right not to speed up. I believe that in competition, anything under 4 hours is a good pace. For a tournament, most players seem to be more deliberate and it throws the off their game without any help from their competitor. As far as your opponent reading The Grateful Golfer…..on never knows! 😉

        Cheers
        Jim

        Like

  3. Jim, I believe that a positive mental attitude on the golf course is derived from confidence. Not to be confused with a positive outlook on life in general. If you lack confidence in your golf game or your abilities, having a positive mental attitude is akin to whistling through the graveyard and will only take you so far, unless you don’t care how well you play. Then you can be positive in all circumstances. To gain confidence you need a grounding in the fundamentals and the intestinal fortitude to push through difficult times. It’s all about the belief that you are doing the right things to improve.

    Thanks – good topic!

    Brian

    Liked by 1 person

    • Brian

      I like hoe you differentiate between positive mental attitude and positive outlook. I agree that confidence with your game is important and is developed over time. Having a positive mental attitude is definitely connected, albeit different for each person. Thanks for weighing in.

      Cheers
      Jim

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I used to wonder why the pro’s would back away from the ball. Maybe it was noise from the crowd or a gust of wind, but I know it’s more than that. They back away just as much to resettle their minds. It’s a habit I need to practice doing more. If you have thoughts creep in that undermine your confidence, in my experience, you’ve already missed the shot.

    Liked by 1 person

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