How Does Your Golf Mind Work?

I routinely ask myself this is a question. When playing each shot, I sometimes take opposite approaches to the same set of influences and yet come to a different conclusion. It is very strange and sometimes I wonder if I have my golf brain engaged at all. It really strange and something I continue to be puzzled about. I often wonder if I really have a golf mind or not!

I talked about the golf mind before when building confidence. Here is an excerpt from a previous post:

DR. BOB ROTELLA, writing for Golf Digest, has ten things that will build confidence in any golfer. Rotella suggests:  “I believe every golfer has the potential to be much better than he or she is, and that using the mind is one essential way to improve. You will never know if you have the ability to be the best player in the world, or the best player in your club, unless you commit yourself to developing both your physical and mental skills.” Rotella’s top points to build your confidence are:

  1. Play to play great. Don’t play not to play poorly.
  2. Love the challenge of the day, whatever it may be.
  3. Get out of results and get into process.
  4. Know that nothing will bother or upset you on the golf course, and you will be in a great state of mind for every shot.
  5. Playing with a feeling that the outcome doesn’t matter is always preferable to caring too much.
  6. Believe fully in yourself so you can play freely.
  7. See where you want the ball to go before every shot.
  8. Be decisive, committed and clear.
  9. Be your own best friend.
  10. Love your wedge and your putter.

I have to keep reminding myself of these very important points to ensure that I keep my golf mind engaged. And yes, I do believe I have a golf mind, but it sometimes wanders. Of the above 10 important characteristics, I believe that seeing where my ball is going to go and being decisive on the shot are key to my golf game. Therefore, engaging my mind specifically on these points is very important to engaging my golf mind.

Lastly, I have to believe in myself, always. It is critical to have complete confidence in my game (swing, course management) during every stroke and decision point. This seems like an obvious comment, but it is really is a necessity.

So, over the next 4 months, I will mentally visualize and meditate on Rotella’s 10 characteristics of a great golfer. It will help that I have an indoor driving range set up so I can focus on being a better player!

What do you think of Rotella’s 10 characteristics of a great golfer?

I am a grateful golfer! See you on the links!

7 thoughts on “How Does Your Golf Mind Work?

  1. Pingback: How Does Your Golf Mind Work? — The Grateful Golfer – LinksMates

  2. Hi Jim,
    I like Bob’s 10 points, and I try to focus and work out the best approach to any shot. But today my first three wedges into the greens were long, nothing that two good putts could not recover. So on the fourth approach I took into account how long the previous shots had been, so came up with a softer shot. It came up just short of the green, leaving a tricky recovery from rough off the green. Would have been better to go long in this instance.Golf is a tough game.

    Like

    • Pete,

      Yeah, that is a tough one for sure. It is interesting how things change from hole to hole. I agree, that being long is generally not a bad thing. That way if you hit is a bit off, it goes the proper distance. It really is a tough call that is made at the time.

      Cheers Jim

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Jim, point #1 is the most difficult because we are hard wired to avoid pain and negativity (fight or flight). Phil Mickelson embodies the philosophy of play great better than anyone. Despite his many setbacks you’d have to say it worked because he’s one of the best ever. Otherwise, I’m a huge Rotella fan and these points really resonate.

    Thanks,

    Brian

    Liked by 1 person

    • Brian

      Phil is a unique players who has an strong mental game. He struggles from time to time, but you do not win 40+ professional golf tournaments without playing great. I am a Rotella fan as well, I like his approach to how to play strong mental golf.

      Cheers Jim

      Liked by 1 person

  4. My version of the pointers are as follows.
    1. Play to play great. Don’t play not to play poorly.
    Don’t swing if doubt enters your mind. Start your routine over if that
    happens.
    2. Love the challenge of the day, whatever it may be.
    Don’t think “challenge”. Think fun.
    3. Get out of results and get into process.
    The second the shots over, it’s over. Start thinking about the next shot.
    4. Know that nothing will bother or upset you on the golf course, and you will be in a great state of mind for every shot.
    Bringing anger or disappointment with you from one shot the next is a
    recipe for failure. See number 3 and forget your bad shots before
    starting your routine.
    5. Playing with a feeling that the outcome doesn’t matter is always preferable to caring too much.
    Visualize your shot and play to your strengths. You won’t have to worry
    if you choose to play a shot you are confident in.
    6. Believe fully in yourself so you can play freely.
    See number 1
    7. See where you want the ball to go before every shot.
    See number 5
    8. Be decisive, committed and clear.
    See number 5
    9. Be your own best friend.
    Play smart. Don’t take chances you don’t have to.
    10. Love your wedge and your putter.
    Spending twice as much time practicing with your wedges and putter
    than your other clubs will pay off with lower scores.

    Like

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