How Tight to Grip a Golf Club

Gripping a golf club is fundamental to a good swing. How we grip a club is a much talked about topic. It is one of the most popular posts at The Grateful Golfer and continues to grow in popularity. The mechanics of holding a club is very much a personal choice. There really is no right or wrong answer if the grip works for you. However, as less talked about topic is to how tightly to grip a golf club. How much pressure his applied to the grip to ensure the maximum movement and flexibility of our hands and wrists to maximize power during contact?

That is a very good question because it is the second, and equally important, topic of the golf grip. Regardless if you use the 10-finger, interlocking, or overlapping grip, how much pressure applied while initially holding the club is critical to a successful stroke. I have a rule of thumb that I use and it works extremely well for all my clubs.

My guideline is very straight forward and can be checked anytime during your round. My rule is simple: grab your putter, adopt your putting grip, and lift the club off the ground 1/2 inch. The pressure required to lift the club is the same pressure that you use to hold your club during your address. It is not any tighter than that; your putter pressure is how tight you should hold your club just prior to starting your drawback.

Now, some are saying that this pressure will not be tight enough to hold their club during the entire swing. And your statement would be partially correct. What many overlook or do not understand is that our grip will increase and decrease as required during their swing. Our hands will innately adjust according to the requirement. It is not something we need to think about and nor should we. The self-adjusting pressure is a natural phenomenon, so do not fight it!

The other important factor regarding the pressure of your grip is tempo. The faster the tempo, the tighter the grip. The tighter the grip the poorer are the results. Everyone has different tempo when swing a golf club. In my case, I have a slightly faster tempo than most, but it is consistent throughout my entire swing. If my tempo speeds up, I grip the club tighter than normal and my wrists lock; the results is my tendency to hook the ball. Conversely, if my tempo is too slow, my pressure is too light, my wrists are loosey-goosey; the results is my tendency to push or slice the ball.

When my grip pressure and tempo are spot-on, I hit the ball straight and long. I have great confidence and at I am at the top of my game. These two points are directly related to a successful golf swing.

If you are curious about your grip pressure during your round, try this quick test. Grab your putter and go through the motions as stated above. Lift and lower your putter about 5 times, then grab your driver with the same grip pressure use a moment ago and swing away. You will find that you are holding your driver more comfortably. As a result, you should make better contact with the ball.

Grip pressure is important. I recommend that you experiment the next time you hit the range (or on the course if you do practice). You will be pleasantly surprised at the results.

I am a grateful golfer! See you on the links!

4 thoughts on “How Tight to Grip a Golf Club

  1. Interesting post. I think we need to think about and perhaps readjust grip pressure every so often as we can unconsciously change what we do over a period of time. One of the best moves I made a while back was to find the ideal grip & ideal layers of tape for my preference. I used to fret about grip size but no longer. One less thing to worry about! Cheers, Rob

    Liked by 1 person

  2. You know, the first time I tried the interlocking grip it caused some pain in my fingers and I gave it up for a long time. I tried using it recently and haven’t even had a twinge this time around. I guess it’s possible I was gripping too tight then though I’m sure I already knew better. I’m not sure if I like it better than overlapping yet, at least with my irons and wedges, but it does give me the feeling like I can release more effectively.

    Well, I got to get out on the course for some heavy practice this afternoon. I skipped around and got in about 30 holes playing two approach shots on most and ending the night with a gorgeous sunset and at a perfect for golf 68 degrees. The irons I went to out work on got their work out, and while I doubt I made any major progress tonight, I saw enough to good shots to have hope. And I do believe I have solved the trajectory problem I’ve been having with with my driver these past few months. Before I changed everything about how I gripped the club last year my hands were really far forward so wrist cock simply did not include wrist cupping and I never gave it a thought. It seems somewhere along the way with my new neutral I started cupping my wrists which increases the effective loft and caused me to be aiming towards the heavens instead of the horizons. After the first couple of holes today I was back to hitting penetrating shots that only reached maybe 100 foot heights instead of 150 or more. Some video I got in my email a couple days ago talked about that and showed Dustin’s bowed wrist at the top of the swing as one of the examples and that had me checking what my wrists were doing today. It’s not often I get such an immediate improvement from watching a video and it capped my day off well. My wrists won’t go where Dustin’s do, but I found that as long as I just got the feeling they were bowed even a little before I started the swing, my ball flight was just fine again.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Kevin

      Sounds like you made great head way with your practice. I do not cup my wrists at the top of my swing and not sure I will moving forward as you mentioned about DJ. 30 holes is a lot of golf, plus hitting two approach shots on both, that works out to a large bucket of balls, I would say that was a great practice session. Yesterday, I shoveled snow……haha.

      Cheers
      Jim

      Like

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