The Most Important Tip Of Any Golf Swing

I am sure that you have read, watched, discussed, and surmised every component of a golf swing. Believe me when I tell you that I have, at nauseum, dissected even the minor movements of my golf swing. After all my efforts to be a student of the game, there is one universal unbreakable tenet that every golfer should follow.

After fiddling with my grip, adjusting my stance, massaging my tempo and moving ball positions, I can say with certainty that if I do not keep my head still during my swing mechanics, none of the above changes make a difference. To ensure there is one constant with which to build my swing, keeping my head still is definitely it.

I know that keeping my head still is critical to my game because this specific movement, or lack there of, has a direct impact on the quality of my hits and scores. The more I focus on keeping my head still, the more solid my contact. It is hard to describe, but believe me if there is one thing I need to consistently do to be effective on the links…..keep my head still.

I think Jack described it the best. If I can continue to keep my head still, I think it will correct many of my current swing woes. I realize that I seem to be focused on my challenges lately and today is the last day I am going to discuss them for awhile. It is time to get back to being grateful, but this does not limit the importance of keeping my head still while playing.

I am a grateful golfer! See you on the links.

4 thoughts on “The Most Important Tip Of Any Golf Swing

  1. I really hate that advice as presented. It misses the point. It’s not the head moving that’s the trouble. It’s us sliding instead of turning that’s the problem. Jacks head moves a lot during the swing. So do the heads of all pro’s. Some more than others. Tiger’s head always moved a lot. His knees bent as he came to transition and sprang just before impact and his head went up and down with them. His head didn’t rotate as much as Jack’s does though. And of course, he didn’t slide away from the target at all.

    And that’s what we want. To keep our heads from moving away from the target or if you prefer from sliding behind the ball. And that requires that we turn as we shift weight to the trail foot and not just slide. The fix is easy. An alignment rod stuck in the ground and pointed so that it would hit you in the hip area if you slide away from the target as your weight shifts back in the backswing. Give yourself about an inch of room. You’ll move a little as you turn and transfer your weight and need the space.

    Had a real up and down few days on the courses I’ve played these past few days. I went ten over on the front nine on a course I’ve shot my best rounds on, then parred out. Then at the home course just a couple days ago I shot 5 under through 10 and lost all 5 on the last 8 holes. Basically 3 swings, 3 simply terrible tee shots did me in. What made that sadder is I played the same 9 holes both times. And I had a couple of decent starts only to get soaked and have to leave. My golf shoes still aren’t dry from the last one that also blew out my new umbrella. There was a ton of wind in that one. Golf life can be hard sometimes. But I’m still grateful. And I’ll be out there again tomorrow.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Kevin,

      I understand your point about keeping our head still. I agree that it is almost impossible to keep our heads completely still during a swing. The point for me is that it prevents me from developing the bobblehead syndrome and allows me to focus on making solid contact. I do not know of any other way to describe the intent of limiting any head movement during a golf swing without getting so technical that beginners just disregard the advice.

      Sounds like you did have some tough outings we all go through those for sure. I do like your attitude of remaining grateful….it is really the best approach for any golf game.

      Cheers Jim

      Like

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