Golf, It Is a Matter of Stats

Earlier in the year I decided to keep more detailed golf stats. I have kept stats in the past, but I was not very diligent about it. Starting nine games ago, I changed my focus to support my ongoing efforts to be a scratch golfer. I hope these core stats will help indicate where my future training sessions should focus. 

Keeping stats is a very good way to point out potential challenges in our game. When creating a sample group of games, I believe it is important to keep the many variables as constant as possible. Therefore, during my games I used the following course set up:

  • Roundel Glen Golf Course;
  • 18 holes
  • Blue Tees;
  • 6549 yards;
  • Played with at least one other player;
  • Titleist Pro V1 golf ball; and
  • Titleist 915 Driver 12 degrees, 915 3-wood 16 degrees, 915 3-hybrid 21 degrees, AP2 Irons, Titleist Vokey Wedges 52, 56, 60 degrees, and the same putter.

The stats I kept and the results (average per round) were:

  • Score – 77.2
  • Fairways hit – 63.5%
  • Greens in Regulation – 44.5%
  • Sand Saves 50%
  • Scramble for Par 47%
  • Putts – 29.3
Jim's Stat Score Card

Jim’s Stat Score Card

During these nine games, my low score was 75 (twice) and my high score was 80 (3 times). I played during different times of the day and none were in the rain.

This is what I conclude from my stats:

GIR percentage is too low – fix – hit more 5 through 8 irons on the range. These are generally my approach irons, so more practice will ensure better control and contact on the course.

Putts – my goal is to putt on average 28 putts per round. This is an aggressive goal, but one I believe I can achieve – fix – putt more from the 8 to 12 foot distance. This distance will help save a few more putts, but also build confidence for the closer putts.

These two observations are enough for now. They are fairly straight forward, however the GIR was a bit surprising. I thought I was hitting more greens in regulation, but apparently this is not the case.

Well, I am off to practice!

I am a grateful golfer! See you on the links!

4 thoughts on “Golf, It Is a Matter of Stats

  1. 28 putts per round is pretty aggressive, but aggressive goals are good and your not all that far off.

    I have always tried to track my stats, mainly GIR, Up and Down %, Putts for round and fairways hit. I had used the OOB Golf App for a few years, but they have discontinued it and last year I started using the Nike Golf 360 App. I have been lax on putting in rounds this year, but need to get back in the habit.

    I had several years in a row where I was around 50% GIR, 50% Fairways and around 30 – 32 putts per round.

    Good luck hitting your targets.

    Like

    • Brewcee

      Thanks for the positive support. I have tracked stats before, but now I am becoming diligent about it. The putts are very important, but GIR is the stat I desperately need to improve. The season is still early! Looking forward to a great season. I hope your season exceeds your expectations!

      Cheers
      Jim

      Like

  2. Jim, you are very consistent in your performance, with a very small range (5 strokes) over 9 rounds played, I’d say your stats are very good leading indicators. If you can go from 8 to 10 GIRs and cut one shot off the putting average, you should be able to cut 3 strokes off your scoring average all other things being the same, right? As you may know, I like to keep detailed stats and have found the GIR is the key to scoring. So much to the point that big GIR rounds are often accompanied by higher total putts, because your proximity number is higher, but it doesn’t really matter. Give me a pile of GIRs and two-putt pars any day!

    Thanks and good luck with your practice! Keep us posted!

    Brian

    Like

    • Brian

      You are correct about consistency. This my normal range. I to believe that GIR is the most important stat. I am a solid putter most days so a higher GIR will result in lower scores. I will update later on my practice sessions. Thanks for the help.

      Cheers
      Jim

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s